As Delhi chokes with ‘very poor’ air, netizens vent their anger; a wave of memes & swipes on X

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New Delhi: For the fifth day in a row, the Central Pollution Control Board has reported that the air quality in the nation’s capital is terrible. The air quality in the nation’s capital rose to 488 from 410 the previous day, according to statistics released by the System of Air Quality Forecasting and Research (SAFAR-India).

The air quality index in Delhi has reached its highest possible level, severe plus, putting residents at risk of major health problems. Sunday’s AQI reading in the nation’s capital, at 454, led the federal administration to take drastic action to prevent the city’s air pollution from reaching catastrophic new heights.

The average AQI was reported at 470 this morning, over 20 times higher than the level advised by the World Health Organization (WHO), according to real-time statistics. The current air quality index is higher than 500, as reported by the System of Air Quality and Weather Forecasting and Research (SAFAR) in India.

As the rabi crop season approaches, farmers in Punjab, Haryana, and Uttar Pradesh have started burning more paddy straw, which has been blamed for the terrible air quality in Delhi.

The AQI may improve if it rains, but the India Meteorological Department (IMD) does not expect any rain in the city.

The Supreme Court issued an order requiring the governments of Delhi, Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, and Rajasthan to submit affidavits detailing the steps they have taken to mitigate air pollution.

Doctors’ Point of View about the Pollution
As the air quality in Delhi and the National Capital Region (NCR) continues to deteriorate, medical professionals and other health experts discussed the negative effects that air pollution may have on a person’s overall health.

According to Dr. Piyush Ranjan, an additional professor in the Department of Medicine at AIIMS, there is scientific data that demonstrates a link between various forms of cancer and air pollution.

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